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Civil Engineer Blog
Civil Engineer and Civil Engineering Student Blog

Take the Stress Out of Moving
While moving can be exciting, it comes with a lot of planning and work from the initial decision to move to unpacking the last box in your new place. One service to consider hiring when moving is a moving service because utilizing an experienced and professional moving company can make the move far less stressful […]
12 Tips For Expanding Your Construction Business
Business growth takes careful planning. This is particularly true in the construction industry. If you are ready to take your construction business to the next level, your first task is to make sure that you have the people and infrastructure that you need to deal with all of the new work. Otherwise, you could find […]
Why Are Underground Utility Surveys Necessary?
When it comes to locating utilities, you need to conduct underground surveys for a number of reasons. For starters you can use the survey to pinpoint the location of the utilities, and identify ant leakages that might need to be addressed immediately. It is important to identify the location of existing pipes if you intend […]
Some Rules of Engagement for Drilling in North Dakota
When it comes to the extraction of mineral resources, the question of ownership is a big one. Surface owners only have the rights to use the surface of the land. Mineral owners have rights to the subsurface, including all oil and gas deposits. Fee owners refer to those that own both. Rights of Surface Owners […]
What You Need To Know About Steel Building Sites
It’s a smart choice to opt for steel buildings over other materials for your factory, office, industrial building, warehouse, or other structure. Steel buildings have numerous benefits and can be adapted for almost any commercial use. Although you’ll need to select a financing option, obtain a building permit, and select a contractor, you’ll also need […]

News – iCivilEngineer.com
The Civil Engineering Portal

5 Best Planned Cities in the World
The world is full of so many beautiful and big cities, but the one that are perhaps the most fascinating are the one that were well planned. In addition, they were born from many different brilliant inspirations and built with a purpose. They also have many kinds of reasons why the cities were built and […]
5 Reasons Why Women Should Take a Career in Civil Engineering
Do you want to go to college and thinking about entering civil engineering? That’s so great to express your ideas of building and also designing structures or interiors. Even if you’re a woman, it doesn’t make you feel doubt. In fact that the engineering world is dominated by men and many people say that this […]
This Is Disadvantage of Civil Engineering You Need to Know
Civil engineering is become the second oldest engineering field and it also one of the most popular programs in university all around the world. A civil engineer is the person who designs everything and the whole world would got surprised. They have to contribute to planning, design, developing and managing the environment and buildings. Such […]
Tips How to Build a Future in the Civil Engineering Industry
A civil engineering industry is one of the best field that has highest paid among the other job or profession. In addition, the modern world and also advent of new age technology make every industry has been positively impacted. Its efficiency has improved and also results increased multifold. Every field has also adversely affected the […]
7 Best Civil Engineering Projects for Future
Civil engineering is a discipline that connected with the design, construction and also maintenance including works such as bridges, roads, dams, airports, and railways. There are so many projects that they have been done, especially for making the world more beautiful. If you want to know more, here 7 best civil engineering projects for future […]
Brillian Innovations that Will Change The World in Future
Without even realizing it, we’re know that all fighting for space, resources and best standard of living in this world. So that’s why many human beings are competitive as the world’s population continues to increase. As a result, there are so many basic resources, such as water and food and not to mention the impact […]
5 Steps to Become a Civil Engineer
Civil engineer is a profession that help design and construct the structures and also infrastructures like roads. It’s not only that, civil engineers are also design and oversee the construction projects, like water treatment plants and tunnel, the building of roads and water supply systems. They do mapping out budget, surveying the land, testing the […]
All You Need To Know About Civil Engineer’s Responsibilities
Civil engineer is important feature in every community in the world. There are so many facts that sparked the interest you may have found to know what your dream job is. So if you want to inspire respect in others, you need to mention a qualification in civil engineering that refers to intelligence, importance and […]
4 Most Popular Civil Engineering Projects of All Time
Civil engineering is an art, skill, a regular profession that design, and make it become a reality. There are so many great civil engineering projects all over the world that transcend time and also to impress the new generation. What are they? You may read the information about 4 most popular civil engineering project of […]

Civil Engineering News -- ScienceDaily
Civil Engineering News -- ScienceDaily
Civil Engineering News and Research. From new mathematical models for building better structures to new corrosion-resistant composites, read all the latest discoveries in civil engineering here.

Wireless sensors that stick to the skin to track our health
Engineers have developed experimental stickers that pick up physiological signals emanating from the skin, then wirelessly beam these health readings to a receiver clipped onto clothing. It's all part of a system called BodyNet.
Stronger graphene oxide 'paper' made with weaker units
A counterintuitive discovery will help engineers make stronger materials.
Researchers develop improved method for studying tsunami risk to bridges, buildings, roads
Researchers are paving the way toward greater safety for coastal residents and infrastructure by developing a better means of modeling the destructive force of tsunami waves.
Detention basins could catch more than stormwater
Everywhere you go there are stormwater detention basins built near large construction projects intended to control the flow of rainwater and runoff. Now, those basins might help in controlling nitrogen runoff into rivers and lakes, according to civil and environmental engineers.
Bending the rules: A revolutionary new way for metals to be malleable
For nearly 100 years, scientists thought they understood everything there was to know about how metals bend. They were wrong. Researchers have demonstrated that the rules of metal-bending aren't so hard and fast after all. Their surprising discovery not only upends previous notions about how metals deform, but could help guide the creation of stronger, more durable materials.
Surprising discovery could change the way industry uses nickel
Nickel is one of the most abundant elements on earth. It is hard, yet malleable, magnetic at room temperature, and a relatively good conductor of electricity and heat. Most notably, nickel is highly corrosion resistant, which provides for a variety of uses by industry. However, scientists have recently discovered that nickel not only corrodes, but does so in a way that scientists least expected.
In the future, this electricity-free tech could help cool buildings in metropolitan areas
Engineers designed a new system to help cool buildings in crowded metropolitan areas without consuming electricity, an important innovation as cities work to adapt to climate change. The system consists of an inexpensive polymer/aluminum film that's installed inside a box at the bottom of a specially designed solar 'shelter.' The film helps keep its surroundings cool by absorbing heat from the air inside the box and transmitting that energy into outer space.
Shared E-scooters aren't always as 'green' as other transport options
People think of electric scooters, or e-scooters, as environmentally friendly ways to get around town. But a new study finds it's not that simple: shared e-scooters may be greener than most cars, but they can be less green than several other options.
Simulation technique can predict microstructures of alloy materials used in jet engines -- before they are made
Researchers were able to rapidly and accurately predict the microstructure of Nickel -- Aluminum (Ni-Al) alloys that are commonly used in the design of jet engine turbine parts. Predictions of the microstructure of these alloys have so far been time-consuming and expensive. The findings have the potential to greatly advance the design of materials -- made up of a range of different alloys -- that are used to make products in several different industry sectors.
How roads can help cool sizzling cities
Special permeable concrete pavement can help reduce the 'urban heat island effect' that causes cities to sizzle in the summer, according to a team of engineers.
Unique method of fabricating 3D porous structures
Researchers have developed a novel method of 3D printing to fabricate 3D porous structures in one step. This method is named as immersion precipitation 3D printing (ip3DP). The porosity of the 3D printed objects is easily controlled by the concentrations of polymers and additives, and the types of solvents.
Tiny bubbles hold clue to better performing industrial technologies
Insights into how minute, yet powerful, bubbles form and collapse on underwater surfaces could help make industrial structures such as ship propellers more hardwearing, research suggests.
Bridging the nanoscale gap: A deep look inside atomic switches
A team of researchers has gained unprecedented insight into the inner workings of an atomic switch. By investigating the composition of the tiny metal 'bridge' that forms inside the switch, their findings may spur the design of atomic switches with improved performance.
Fiber-optic vibration sensors could prevent train accidents
Researchers have developed new sensors for measuring acceleration and vibration on trains. The technology could be integrated with artificial intelligence to prevent railway accidents and catastrophic train derailments.
Flood prediction model developed
The duration of floods can be determined by river flow, precipitation and atmospheric blocking. Now an international team of researchers is offering a novel physically based Bayesian network model for inference and prediction of flood duration. The model also accurately examines the timescales of flooding.
New superomniphobic glass soars high on butterfly wings using machine learning
Glass for technologies like displays, tablets, laptops, smartphones, and solar cells need to pass light through, but could benefit from a surface that repels water, dirt, oil, and other liquids. Researchers have created a nanostructure glass that takes inspiration from the wings of the glasswing butterfly to create a new type of glass that is not only very clear across a wide variety of wavelengths and angles, but is also antifogging.
Thicker pavement is more cost effective down the road
Pavements, which are vulnerable to increased temperatures and excessive flooding due to sea level rise, can crack and crumble. Climate change can be a major contributor and as greenhouse gas emissions continue these issues are projected to accelerate. Researchers say because of this one of the best ways to extend the life cycle of roads, and keep future costs down, is to increase the thickness of asphalt on certain roads.
New high-definition satellite radar can detect bridges at risk of collapse from space
An early warning system to identify at-risk structures using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) has been developed. The system could be applied to infrastructure projects including roads, railways and building developments at lower cost and greater accuracy than existing techniques.
Vitamin C is key to protection of exciting new nanomaterial
In work that could open a floodgate of future applications for a new class of nanomaterials known as MXenes (pronounced 'Maxines'), researchers have discovered a simple, inexpensive way to prevent the materials' rapid degradation.
How to reduce extreme heat in city neighborhoods
Planting more vegetation, using reflective materials on hard surfaces and installing green roofs on buildings can help cool potentially deadly urban heat islands -- a phenomenon that exists in nearly all large cities -- a new study shows.
X-ray imaging provides clues to fracture in solid-state batteries
Researchers have used X-ray computed tomography (CT) to visualize in real time how cracks form near the edges of the interfaces between materials in solid-state batteries. The findings could help researchers find ways to improve the energy storage devices.
Optimal models of thermodynamic properties
Researchers are beginning to employ Bayesian methods in developing optimal models of thermodynamic properties. Research focused on hafnium (Hf), a metal emerging as a key component in computer electronics.
How soft materials react to deformation at molecular level
Before designing the next generation of soft materials, researchers must first understand how they behave during rapidly changing deformation. In a new study, researchers challenged previous assumptions regarding polymer behavior with newly developed laboratory techniques that measure polymer flow at the molecular level.
Electron-behaving nanoparticles rock current understanding of matter
Researchers have made a strange and startling discovery that nanoparticles engineered with DNA in colloidal crystals -- when extremely small -- behave just like electrons.
New e-tattoo enables accurate, uninterrupted heart monitoring for days
A new wearable technology that is made from stretchy, lightweight material, could make heart health monitoring easier and more accurate.
A forest of nano-mushroom structures keep this plastic clean and stain-free
Researchers have created a flexible optical plastic that is stain-resistant and superomniphobic, finding inspiration in a surprising place: the shape of Enoki mushrooms.
Fracking linked to higher radon levels in Ohio homes
A new study connects the proximity of fracking to higher household concentrations of radon gas, the second leading cause of lung cancer in the US.
Materials informatics reveals new class of super-hard alloys
A new method of discovering materials using data analytics and electron microscopy has found a new class of extremely hard alloys. Such materials could potentially withstand severe impact from projectiles, providing better protection for soldiers in combat.
The mantis shrimp's perfect shield
The shield-like tail segment, or telson, of the smasher mantis shrimp is a multiscale structure with ridges on the outside and a structure shaped like a spiral staircase on the inside. It's inspiring a new class of lightweight, impact-resistant materials for helmets, cars, and more
Dashing the dream of ideal 'invisibility' cloaks for stress waves
Some have dreamt of the perfect cloak to make buildings impervious to stress waves caused by bombs, earthquakes or other calamities. Sorry, researchers are now dashing the dream. But there's still hope. They also say it's possible to make imperfect, real-world cloaks that will actually do some good by adding significant partial protection against some common earthquake waves.
A polar-bear-inspired material for heat insulation
For engineers, polar bear hair is a dream template for synthetic materials that might lock in heat just as well as the natural version. Now, materials scientists have developed such an insulator, reproducing the structure of individual polar bear hairs while scaling toward a material composed of many hairs for real-world applications in the architecture and aerospace sectors.
Pistons are muscling up
Researchers have developed a new way to design pistons that replaces their conventional rigid elements with a mechanism using compressible structures inside a membrane made of soft materials. The resulting 'tension pistons' generate more than three times the force of comparable conventional pistons, eliminate much of the friction, and at low pressures are up to 40 percent more energy efficient.
Intercultural communication crucial for engineering education
In an increasingly connected world it helps to engage with other cultures without prejudice or assumption. This is true in engineering as it is in any other field, but researchers reveal shortcomings in how intercultural communication is taught to potential engineers.
Cycling lanes reduce fatalities for all road users, study shows
The most comprehensive study of bicycle and road safety to date finds that building safe facilities for cyclists is one of the biggest factors in road safety for everyone. Bicycling infrastructure -- specifically, separated and protected bike lanes -- leads to fewer fatalities and better road-safety outcomes for all road users.
3D printed artificial corneas similar to human ones
Medical researchers have 3D printed an artificial cornea using the bioink which is made of decellularized corneal stroma and stem cells. Because this cornea is made of corneal tissue-derived bioink, it is biocompatible, and 3D cell printing technology recapitulates the corneal microenvironment, therefore, its transparency is similar to the human cornea.
Researchers create soft, flexible materials with enhanced properties
Polymer chemists and engineers have developed a new methodology that can be used to create a class of stretchable polymer composites with enhanced electrical and thermal properties. These materials are promising candidates for use in soft robotics, self-healing electronics and medical devices.
Gas vs. electric? Fuel choice affects efforts to achieve low-energy and low-impact homes
If you want to make your home as energy-efficient and green as possible, should you use gas or electric for your heating and cooling needs?
Bringing human-like reasoning to driverless car navigation
With aims of bringing more human-like reasoning to autonomous vehicles, researchers have created a system that uses only simple maps and visual data to enable driverless cars to navigate routes in new, complex environments.
Robots activated by water may be the next frontier
Scientists have developed material that can drive mechanical systems, with movements controlled by a pattern set into the design. Potential applications include opening windows in humidity, and allowing fabric to evaporate sweat
Data science helps engineers discover new materials for solar cells and LEDs
Engineers have developed a high-throughput computational method to design new materials for next generation solar cells and LEDs. Their approach generated 13 new material candidates for solar cells and 23 new candidates for LEDs.
Researchers create washable sensor that can be woven into materials
Researchers have developed a low-cost sensor that can be interlaced into textiles and composite materials. While the research is still new, the sensor may pave the way for smart clothing that can monitor human movement.
Machine learning predicts mechanical properties of porous materials
Machine learning can be used to predict the properties of a group of materials which, according to some, could be as important to the 21st century as plastics were to the 20th.
Viable, environmentally-friendly alternative to Styrofoam
Researchers have developed an environmentally-friendly, plant-based material that for the first time works better than Styrofoam for insulation.
Fracking: Earthquakes are triggered well beyond fluid injection zones
Using data from field experiments and computer modeling of ground faults, researchers have discovered that the practice of subsurface fluid injection used in 'fracking' and wastewater disposal for oil and gas exploration could cause significant, rapidly spreading earthquake activity beyond the fluid diffusion zone. The results account for the observation that the frequency of man-made earthquakes in some regions of the country surpass natural earthquake hotspots.
Diagnosing urban air pollution exposure with new precision
A new review of studies on levels of urban exposure to airborne pollutants and their effects on human health suggests that advanced instrumentation and information technology will soon allow researchers and policymakers to gauge the health risks of air pollution on an individual level.
Filling in the gaps of connected car data helps transportation planners
An engineer has created a method to fill in the gaps of available connected vehicle data, which will give transportation planners a more accurate picture of traffic in their cities. It is also a more cost-effective data gathering system than what is currently available.
Developing a model critical in creating better devices
Chemical engineers have developed a new computational model to better understand the relationship between water and a type of two-dimensional material.
Artificial mother-of-pearl created using bacteria
A biologist invented an inexpensive and environmentally friendly method for making artificial nacre using an innovative component: bacteria. The artificial nacre is made of biologically produced materials and has the toughness of natural nacre, while also being stiff and, surprisingly, bendable. The method used to create the novel material could lead to new applications in medicine, engineering -- and even constructing buildings on the moon.
Working out makes hydrogels perform more like muscle
Human skeletal muscles have a unique combination of properties that materials researchers seek for their own creations. They're strong, soft, full of water, and resistant to fatigue. A new study has found one way to give synthetic hydrogels this total package of characteristics: putting them through a vigorous workout.
Engineers demonstrate 'bubbles' of sand
A new study shows how two types of sand can behave like light and heavy liquids, shedding light on geological processes from mudslides to volcanoes and potentially enabling new technologies from pharmaceutical production to carbon capture.
Engineering researcher uses network science to understand how materials work
Using network science -- part of a larger mathematical field called graph theory -- a professor mapped long range atomic forces onto an incredibly complex graph to simulate macroscopic material behavior.
Antimicrobial paints have a blind spot
Researchers tested bacteria commonly found inside homes on samples of drywall coated with antimicrobial, synthetic latex paints. Within 24 hours, all bacteria died except for Bacillus timonensis, a spore-forming bacterium.
Exploring what happens inside fires and explosions
The inside of a fire might be the last place one would explore, but a new method to do just that could lead to advances in fighting fires, creating cleaner engines and even space travel.
Morphing origami takes a new shape, expanding use possibilities
Researchers have created a new type of origami that can morph from one pattern into a different one, or even a hybrid of two patterns, instantly altering many of its structural characteristics.
Up in arms: Insect-inspired arm technology aims to improve drones
Insect-inspired arm technology aims to improve drones to handle larger payloads.
'Deep learning' casts wide net for novel 2D materials
Engineers use 'deep learning' techniques to speed up simulations of novel two-dimensional materials to understand their characteristics and how they're affected by high temperature and radiation.
Graphene coating could help prevent lithium battery fires
Researchers report that graphene -- wonder material of the 21st century -- may take the oxygen out of lithium battery fires.
Laying the ground for robotic strategies in environmental protection
Roboticists have developed a robot named 'Romu' that can autonomously drive interlocking steel sheet piles into soil. The structures that it builds could function as retaining walls or check dams for erosion control, and, according to computer simulations, the robot could be deployed in swarms to help protect threatened areas that are flooded or extremely arid more effectively.
Researchers uncover hidden deicer risks affecting bridge health
Common magnesium chloride deicers used on roadways and bridges around the U.S. may be doing more damage than previously thought, researchers have found.
Teaching computers to intelligently design 'billions' of possible materials
Researchers are applying one of the first uses of deep learning -- the technology computers use to intelligently perform tasks such as recognizing language and driving autonomous vehicles -- to the field of materials science.

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