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Civil Engineer Blog
Civil Engineer and Civil Engineering Student Blog

You Should Hire an Architect Even If You Buy Blueprints
Planning new construction means balancing a lot of different factors, and there are some design firms out there that try to simplify the costs and the number of steps in your process by offering ready-to-go blueprint designs for common buildings and home styles. They can be a good option, but a lot of people planning […]
Sump Pump Maintenance Tips
Your sump pump is one of the most important components of your house.  Although it mainly works on its own, it needs to have maintenance done on a regular basis in order to keep it operating properly. Usually a sump pump is located in the basement or a crawl space.  It pumps income water outside […]
How to Avoid Complications When Using MDF
MDF provides the perfect budget friendly option as a material for many of your home improvement projects. From kitchen cupboard doors to custom furniture, the versatility of MDF is wide ranging. However, to ensure longevity and the best quality finish for your MDF projects, there are a few guidelines to follow. Board Type It is […]
A Guide to Ground Penetrating Radar Services
Undergrounding utilities, either with a concrete slab indoors or outdoors before getting down to work, is a must, especially when it comes to mapping and surveying the site of your project. To identify subsurface utilities including buried fiber optics, asphalt, concrete, terracotta, composite pipes, gas lines and plastic water pipes, GPR which is designed using […]
Five Ways To Evaluate Your Projects
We all want our projects to be a success but how can you know for sure if you’ve achieved everything you set out to? Why not try these five ways to evaluate your projects. You’ll be able to assess your achievements objectively and quickly. 1. Compare schedule performance Use the dashboards and reports produced by […]

News – iCivilEngineer.com
The Civil Engineering Portal

7 Best Civil Engineering Projects for Future
Civil engineering is a discipline that connected with the design, construction and also maintenance including works such as bridges, roads, dams, airports, and railways. There are so many projects that they have been done, especially for making the world more beautiful. If you want to know more, here 7 best civil engineering projects for future […]
Brillian Innovations that Will Change The World in Future
Without even realizing it, we’re know that all fighting for space, resources and best standard of living in this world. So that’s why many human beings are competitive as the world’s population continues to increase. As a result, there are so many basic resources, such as water and food and not to mention the impact […]
5 Best Reasons Why You Should Become a Civil Engineer
There are so many questions about what civil engineers do, even no one knows why in the world would want to be. It surrounds the world in which they live, such as if you’ve walked on a bridge, stood in a building, observed a retaining wall or even looked at a dam, it’s the result […]
5 Steps to Become a Civil Engineer
Civil engineer is a profession that help design and construct the structures and also infrastructures like roads. It’s not only that, civil engineers are also design and oversee the construction projects, like water treatment plants and tunnel, the building of roads and water supply systems. They do mapping out budget, surveying the land, testing the […]
Top 3 Highest Civil Engineer Salary You Should Know
Civil engineering is one of the most popular programs in university and become the second oldest engineering field. To earn a high salary as civil engineer you should make a large contribute to the building and environment, such as roads, dams, canals, Buildings and also bridges. You can find the highest paid careers if you […]
Top 5 European Master’s Degrees in Civil Engineering
Getting a master’s degree in civil engineering field is not simple as we thought. The culmination of years of study in an undergraduate programme that followed in some cases by years by years of practical industry experience. The master degree is worth your time and also effort though. It will allow you to stand out […]
All You Need To Know About Civil Engineer’s Responsibilities
Civil engineer is important feature in every community in the world. There are so many facts that sparked the interest you may have found to know what your dream job is. So if you want to inspire respect in others, you need to mention a qualification in civil engineering that refers to intelligence, importance and […]
4 Most Popular Civil Engineering Projects of All Time
Civil engineering is an art, skill, a regular profession that design, and make it become a reality. There are so many great civil engineering projects all over the world that transcend time and also to impress the new generation. What are they? You may read the information about 4 most popular civil engineering project of […]

Civil Engineering News -- ScienceDaily
Civil Engineering News -- ScienceDaily
Civil Engineering News and Research. From new mathematical models for building better structures to new corrosion-resistant composites, read all the latest discoveries in civil engineering here.

A laser technique proves effective to recover material designed to protect industrial products
The system has been validated for non-stick and anticorrosive coatings used in the manufacturing of a wide range of objects from car engines to kitchen utensils.
Water-resistant electronic skin with self-healing abilities created
Inspired by jellyfish, researchers have created an electronic skin that is transparent, stretchable, touch-sensitive, and repairs itself in both wet and dry conditions. The novel material has wide-ranging uses, from water-resistant touch screens to soft robots aimed at mimicking biological tissues.
Light provides control for 3D printing with multiple materials
Scientists have developed a novel 3D printer that uses patterns of visible and ultraviolet light to dictate which of two monomers are polymerized to form a solid material. Different patterns of light provide the spatial control necessary to yield multi-material parts.
Novel technology aims to improve lithium metal battery life, safety
Rechargeable lithium metal batteries with increased energy density, performance, and safety may be possible with a newly-developed, solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI), according to researchers.
Scientists engineer mouse 'smart house' to study behavior
Researchers have developed a 'smart house' for mice, that allows them to study the animals' behavior with minimal disturbance for periods of up to 18 months.
Engineers develop inexpensive, smart stop sign to improve driver safety
According to the US Department of Transportation, more than half of all roadway fatalities occur on rural roads. Now engineers are building and testing a low-cost, self-powered thermal system that will detect vehicles, improve the visibility of stop signs and prevent early deaths.
Distracted drivers 29 times more likely to wreck in a highway work zone
Highway work zone crashes happen every 5.4 minutes. Now, a new study says an inattentive driver is 29 times more likely to cause a collision or near collision in a work zone
New blueprint for understanding, predicting and optimizing complex nanoparticles
Northwestern University researchers have developed a blueprint for understanding and predicting the properties and behavior of complex nanoparticles and optimizing their use for a broad range of scientific applications. These include catalysis, optoelectronics, transistors, bio-imaging, and energy storage and conversion.
Researchers engineer a tougher fiber
Researchers have developed a fiber that combines the elasticity of rubber with the strength of a metal, resulting in a tougher material that could be incorporated into soft robotics, packaging materials or next-generation textiles.
Automated speed enforcement doesn't just reduce collisions -- it helps reduce crime
It's widely accepted that automated photo enforcement programs targeting speeding help reduce collisions and promote safe driving. Now a new study suggests they can also significantly reduce crime in the neighborhoods in which they are deployed.
Fibers from old tires can improve fire resistance of concrete
A new way of protecting concrete from fire damage using materials recycled from old tires has been successfully tested.
Lobster's underbelly is as tough as industrial rubber
Flip a lobster on its back, and you'll see that the underside of its tail is split in segments connected by a translucent membrane that appears rather vulnerable when compared with the armor-like carapace that shields the rest of the crustacean. But engineers have found that this soft membrane is surprisingly tough, with a microscopic, layered, plywood-like structure that makes it remarkably tolerant to scrapes and cuts.
Sustainable electronics manufacturing breakthrough
Researchers are developing an eco-friendly, 3D printable solution for producing wireless Internet-of-Things (IoT) sensors that can be used and disposed of without contaminating the environment.
Developable mechanisms can reside inside the surface of a structure
Engineers detail new technology that allows them to build complex mechanisms into the exterior of a structure without taking up any actual space below the surface. This new class of mechanisms, called 'developable mechanisms,' get their name from developable surfaces, or materials that can take on 3-D shapes from flat conformations without tearing or stretching, like a sheet of paper or metal.
Researchers develop fire-retardant coating featuring renewable materials
Researchers are developing a new kind of flame-retardant coating using renewable, nontoxic materials readily found in nature, which could provide even more effective fire protection for several widely used materials.
Research will help urban planners prioritize bike lanes
A new virtual tool could help planners choose the best places to install bikes lanes in cities. The data-based tool builds on previous research that validated the safety benefits of bike lanes for cyclists and motorists.
Scientists use smartphones to improve dismal rating of nation's civil infrastructure
Scientists at the have developed smartphone-based technologies that can monitor civil infrastructure systems such as crumbing roads and aging bridges.
Researchers use artificial neural networks to streamline materials testing
Investigators have paired artificial neural networks (ANN) with dynamic mechanical analysis to quickly formulate and provide analytics on theoretical graphene-enhanced advanced composites.
Nano-infused ceramic could report on its own health
Ceramics with networked nanosheets of graphene and white graphene would have the unique ability to alter their electrical properties when strained. The surprising ability could lead to new types of structural sensors.
Magnetic teeth hold promise for materials and energy
Researchers have discovered a piece of the genetic puzzle that allows a mollusk to produce magnetite nanomaterials.
Toppled train offers insight into ground motion, origin of 1906 earthquake
By mathematically modeling the movements of a locomotive that toppled from the tracks north of San Francisco during the city's infamous 1906 earthquake, researchers have calculated a lower limit on the earthquake ground motion at the spot of the tipped train.
Measuring stress around cells
Tissues and organs in the human body are shaped through forces generated by cells, that push and pull, to 'sculpt' biological structures. Thanks to a new tool, scientists will now be able to watch, and map these forces.
Fluid-inspired material self-heals before your eyes
Engineers have developed a new coating strategy for metal that self-heals within seconds when scratched, scraped or cracked. The novel material could prevent these tiny defects from turning into localized corrosion, which can cause major structures to fail.
Static electricity could charge our electronics
Static electricity is one of the most common, yet poorly understand, forms of power generation. A new study suggests the cause of this hair-raising phenomenon is tiny structural changes that occur at the surface of materials when they come into contact with each other. The finding could someday help technology companies create more sustainable and longer-lasting power sources for small electronic devices.
Creating attraction between molecules deep in the periodic table
Researchers provide the first experimental and theoretical proof that it is possible to form strong, stable attractions between some of the heavier elements in the periodic table -- such as arsenic or even antimony. Because hydrogen is not involved in creating the bond between these elements, these new materials should be resistant to water and humidity.
From toilet to brickyard: Recycling biosolids to make sustainable bricks
Around 30 percent of the world's biosolids are stockpiled or sent to landfill each year, while over 3 billion cubic meters of clay soil is dug up for the global brickmaking industry. Using biosolids in bricks offers an innovative solution to these environmental challenges.
Mechanical engineers develop process to 3-D print piezoelectric materials
New printing technique and materials could be used to develop intelligent materials and self-adaptive infrastructures and transducers.
Stress fracture? Your foot hitting pavement wasn't the main problem
It starts as a persistent and irritating pain in the foot or lower leg, then it gets more intense, maybe with swelling, and soon a runner knows she's being sidelined by one of the most common running injuries: a stress fracture. These tiny cracks in the bone can halt training for months or even end a sports season. A segment of the multibillion-dollar wearables industry aims to save potential victims from this fate, but an engineering professor found a major problem: the devices are measuring the wrong thing.
Additive manufacturing reflects fundamental metallurgical principles to create materials
Engineers have been taking a novel approach to the development of engineering components produced using additive manufacturing.
Proposed engineering method could help make buildings and bridges safer
Researchers discovered that the distance between dislocations in nanolayer interfaces of pearlite can determine how much the material can stretch or contract without breaking (ductility). The dislocations are disruptions in the regular arrangements of atoms in nanolayers. This discovery opens the possibility of engineering materials with higher ductility by simply manipulating the spacing between their dislocations and may improve the safety of structures such as buildings and bridges in earthquakes.
Drones shown to make traffic crash site assessments safer, faster and more accurate
Research shows that drones can be more effective and safer in crash mapping of vehicular highway accidents than conventional methods. Drones using new imaging technology allows highway safety officers to capture and print 3D composites of crash sites and reduce mapping time and improve traffic flow following a crash by 60 percent.
Breakthrough in ice-repelling materials
Icy weather is blamed for multibillion dollar losses every year in the United States, including delays and damage related to air travel, infrastructure and power generation and transmission facilities. Now researchers have reported creating a durable silicone polymer coating capable of repelling ice from any surface.
Engineers 3D print smart objects with 'embodied logic'
Using stimuli-responsive materials and geometric principles, engineers have designed structures that have 'embodied logic.' Through their physical and chemical makeup alone, they are able to determine which of multiple possible responses to make in response to their environment.
Keeping roads in good shape reduces greenhouse gas emissions
Keeping road pavement in good shape saves money and energy and reduces greenhouse gas emissions, more than offsetting pollution generated during road construction, according to a new study.
Animals may get used to drones
A new study shows that over time, bears get used to drones. Previous work indicated that animals behave fearfully or show a stress response near drone flights. Using heart monitors to gauge stress, however, researchers here found that bears habituated to drones over a 3 to 4-week period and remained habituated.
'Realistic' new model points the way to more efficient and profitable fracking
A new computational model could potentially boost efficiencies and profits in natural gas production by better predicting previously hidden fracture mechanics. It also accurately accounts for the known amounts of gas released during the process.
Cartilage could be key to safe 'structural batteries'
Your knees and your smartphone battery have some surprisingly similar needs, a professor has discovered, and that new insight has led to a 'structural battery' prototype that incorporates a cartilage-like material to make the batteries highly durable and easy to shape.
Scientists design new responsive porous material inspired by proteins
Scientists have, for the first time, synthesized a new material that exhibits structural change and triggered chemical activity like a protein.
Powerful X-ray beams unlock secrets of nanoscale crystal formation
High-energy X-ray beams and a clever experimental setup allowed researchers to watch a high-pressure, high-temperature chemical reaction to determine for the first time what controls formation of two different nanoscale crystalline structures in the metal cobalt. The technique allowed continuous study of cobalt nanoparticles as they grew from clusters including tens of atoms to crystals as large as five nanometers.
Graphene's magic is in the defects
A team of researchers has solved a longstanding puzzle of how to build ultra-sensitive, ultra-small electrochemical sensors with homogenous and predictable properties by discovering how to engineer graphene structure on an atomic level.
New megalibrary approach proves useful for the rapid discovery of new materials
Identifying the best material for a given application -- catalysts, light-harvesting structures, biodiagnostic labels, pharmaceuticals and electronic devices -- is traditionally a slow and daunting task. Now, a new study supports the efficacy of a potentially revolutionary new discovery tool to rapidly test millions (even billions) of nanoparticles to determine the best for a specific use. The tool is thousands of times faster than conventional screening methods.
Paradigm shift needed for designing tsunami-resistant bridges
Researchers argue in a new study that a paradigm shift is needed for assessing bridges' tsunami risk.
A damming trend
Hundreds of dams are being proposed for Mekong River basin in Southeast Asia. The negative social and environmental consequences -- affecting everything from food security to the environment -- greatly outweigh the positive changes of this grand-scale flood control, according to new research.
The stiffest porous lightweight materials ever
Researchers have developed and manufactured a family of architectures that maximizes the stiffness of porous lightweight materials. It's practically impossible to develop stiffer designs.
Chemical engineers develop new theory to build improved nanomaterials
Researchers have developed a new theory to better predict how nanoclusters will behave when a given metal is introduced to their structure.
Shape-shifting origami could help antenna systems adapt on the fly
Researchers have devised a method for using an origami-based structure to create radio frequency filters that have adjustable dimensions, enabling the devices to change which signals they block throughout a large range of frequencies.
Using machine learning to design peptides
Scientists have developed a way of finding optimal peptide sequences: using a machine-learning algorithm as a collaborator. The algorithm analyzes experimental data and offers suggestions on the next best sequence to try, creating a back-and-forth selection process that reduces time needed to find the optimal peptide. The results could provide a new framework for experiments across materials science and chemistry.
Method to transfer entire 2D circuits to any smooth surface
Engineers have developed a method to transfer complete, flexible, two-dimensional circuits from their fabrication platforms to curved and other smooth surfaces. Such circuits are able to couple with near-field electromagnetic waves and offer next-generation sensing for optical fibers and other applications.
US interstate highways need overhaul, says new report
The future of the US Interstate Highway System is threatened by a persistent and growing backlog of structural and operational deficiencies and by various looming challenges, such as the progress of automated vehicles, developments in electric vehicles, and vulnerabilities due to climate change.
A new way to see stress -- using supercomputers
Supercomputer simulations show that at the atomic level, material stress doesn't behave symmetrically. Widely-used atomic stress formulae significantly underestimate stress near stress concentrators such as dislocation core, crack tip, or interface, in a material under deformation. Supercomputers simulate force interactions of Lennard-Jones perfect single crystal of 240,000 atoms. Study findings could help scientists design new materials such as glass or metal that doesn't ice up.
'Sudoku' X-Ray uncovers movements within opaque materials
Researchers have developed a new X-ray method which involves solving a giant 3D Sudoku problem to better understand these granular movements -- and the findings could have a big impact on various industries.
Innate 'fingerprint' could detect tampered steel parts
Researchers using magnetic signals have found unique 'fingerprints' on steel, which could help to verify weapons treaties and reduce the use of counterfeit bolts in the construction industry.
Extremely strong and yet incredibly ductile multicomponent alloys developed
A research team has developed a novel strategy to develop new high-strength alloys which are extremely strong and yet also ductile and flexible. The strategy overcomes the critical issues of the strength-ductility trade-off dilemma, paving the way for developing innovative structural materials in future.
New 'smart' material with potential biomedical, environmental uses
By combining seaweed-derived alginate with the nanomaterial graphene oxide, researchers have developed a new material that's durable and can respond dynamically to its environment.
Electrical cable triggers lightweight, fire-resistant cladding discovery
New research has led the successful development of an organic, non-combustible and lightweight cladding core -- a product that was previously thought to be impossible to create.
Smart car technologies save drivers $6.2 billion on fuel costs each year
In the first study to assess the energy impact of smart technology in cars, researchers have put a number on the potential fuel-cost savings alone: $6.2 billion.
Where you go tells who you are -- and vice versa
Mining data to analyze tracking patterns, scientists can infer the population travel demand level in a region from the trajectories of just a portion of travelers. They found three distinct groups whose demographics they could infer based on their travel patterns: seniors, who travel to a wider variety of places in a day; workers, who stay mostly at work or at home; parents, who visit more individual places in a day.
'Smart skin' simplifies spotting strain in structures
A 'smart skin' employs the unique fluorescent characteristics of carbon nanotubes to quickly assess strain in materials. The method is intended for aircraft, spacecraft and critical infrastructures in which mechanical strain needs to be monitored.
What's next for smart homes: An 'Internet of Ears?'
A pair of electrical engineering and computer science professors have been experimenting with a new suite of smart-home sensors. Their system would read not only the vibrations, sounds -- and even the specific gait, or other movements -- associated with people and animals in a building, but also any subtle changes in the existing ambient electrical field.
Next-gen batteries possible with new engineering approach
Dramatically longer-lasting, faster-charging and safer lithium metal batteries may be possible, according to new research.

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