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Civil Engineer Blog
Civil Engineer and Civil Engineering Student Blog

Improving the Accessibility of Your Home
There are times in which accessibility becomes an issue in your home. Perhaps you are growing older or have suffered an injury or illness that requires different accessibility needs. Rather than try and find a new home that better matches your new conditions, there are several methods of improving the accessibility within your own home. […]
3 Reasons To Consider Roller Shades For Your Business
Whether you are searching for a solution to the persistent sun glare in your business or hope to incorporate a more modern aesthetic, there is an easy and long-lasting solution. Here are three reasons why you should consider solar roller shades New York for your office or work space. Sun Protection If your business has […]
Benefits of Properly Selected Pipe
Piping systems are the veins of manufacturing and chemical processing facilities. Corrosion, leakage, and improper ratings can cause major issues in both productivity and safety. Selecting and properly installing the correct pipe for your installation can save you significant resources in the long run. Considering these three factors can help minimize the risks of improper […]
Making a Homeowners Dreams of a Deck a Reality
Homeowners often don’t utilize their outdoor space as well as they could. This is usually due to the lack of a deck area. Decks are ideal for entertaining or simply relaxing on a beautiful summer afternoon. Sadly, many homeowners don’t believe they can add a deck, but many obstacles are easy to overcome. Uneven Ground […]
Safety Should Always be Your Top Priority on the Worksite
It is easy to become comfortable on the worksite. What at first seemed dangerous will eventually become just another part of your day. As you become more comfortable in dangerous situations, you will let your guard down. This can lead to accidents and injuries that could have easily been prevented. Take the time to periodically […]

News – iCivilEngineer.com
The Civil Engineering Portal

7 Best Civil Engineering Projects for Future
Civil engineering is a discipline that connected with the design, construction and also maintenance including works such as bridges, roads, dams, airports, and railways. There are so many projects that they have been done, especially for making the world more beautiful. If you want to know more, here 7 best civil engineering projects for future […]
Brillian Innovations that Will Change The World in Future
Without even realizing it, we’re know that all fighting for space, resources and best standard of living in this world. So that’s why many human beings are competitive as the world’s population continues to increase. As a result, there are so many basic resources, such as water and food and not to mention the impact […]
5 Steps to Become a Civil Engineer
Civil engineer is a profession that help design and construct the structures and also infrastructures like roads. It’s not only that, civil engineers are also design and oversee the construction projects, like water treatment plants and tunnel, the building of roads and water supply systems. They do mapping out budget, surveying the land, testing the […]
Top 3 Highest Civil Engineer Salary You Should Know
Civil engineering is one of the most popular programs in university and become the second oldest engineering field. To earn a high salary as civil engineer you should make a large contribute to the building and environment, such as roads, dams, canals, Buildings and also bridges. You can find the highest paid careers if you […]
Top 5 European Master’s Degrees in Civil Engineering
Getting a master’s degree in civil engineering field is not simple as we thought. The culmination of years of study in an undergraduate programme that followed in some cases by years by years of practical industry experience. The master degree is worth your time and also effort though. It will allow you to stand out […]
All You Need To Know About Civil Engineer’s Responsibilities
Civil engineer is important feature in every community in the world. There are so many facts that sparked the interest you may have found to know what your dream job is. So if you want to inspire respect in others, you need to mention a qualification in civil engineering that refers to intelligence, importance and […]
4 Most Popular Civil Engineering Projects of All Time
Civil engineering is an art, skill, a regular profession that design, and make it become a reality. There are so many great civil engineering projects all over the world that transcend time and also to impress the new generation. What are they? You may read the information about 4 most popular civil engineering project of […]

Civil Engineering News -- ScienceDaily
Civil Engineering News -- ScienceDaily
Civil Engineering News and Research. From new mathematical models for building better structures to new corrosion-resistant composites, read all the latest discoveries in civil engineering here.

Robots activated by water may be the next frontier
Scientists have developed material that can drive mechanical systems, with movements controlled by a pattern set into the design. Potential applications include opening windows in humidity, and allowing fabric to evaporate sweat
Data science helps engineers discover new materials for solar cells and LEDs
Engineers have developed a high-throughput computational method to design new materials for next generation solar cells and LEDs. Their approach generated 13 new material candidates for solar cells and 23 new candidates for LEDs.
Researchers create washable sensor that can be woven into materials
Researchers have developed a low-cost sensor that can be interlaced into textiles and composite materials. While the research is still new, the sensor may pave the way for smart clothing that can monitor human movement.
Machine learning predicts mechanical properties of porous materials
Machine learning can be used to predict the properties of a group of materials which, according to some, could be as important to the 21st century as plastics were to the 20th.
Viable, environmentally-friendly alternative to Styrofoam
Researchers have developed an environmentally-friendly, plant-based material that for the first time works better than Styrofoam for insulation.
Fracking: Earthquakes are triggered well beyond fluid injection zones
Using data from field experiments and computer modeling of ground faults, researchers have discovered that the practice of subsurface fluid injection used in 'fracking' and wastewater disposal for oil and gas exploration could cause significant, rapidly spreading earthquake activity beyond the fluid diffusion zone. The results account for the observation that the frequency of man-made earthquakes in some regions of the country surpass natural earthquake hotspots.
Diagnosing urban air pollution exposure with new precision
A new review of studies on levels of urban exposure to airborne pollutants and their effects on human health suggests that advanced instrumentation and information technology will soon allow researchers and policymakers to gauge the health risks of air pollution on an individual level.
Filling in the gaps of connected car data helps transportation planners
An engineer has created a method to fill in the gaps of available connected vehicle data, which will give transportation planners a more accurate picture of traffic in their cities. It is also a more cost-effective data gathering system than what is currently available.
Developing a model critical in creating better devices
Chemical engineers have developed a new computational model to better understand the relationship between water and a type of two-dimensional material.
Artificial mother-of-pearl created using bacteria
A biologist invented an inexpensive and environmentally friendly method for making artificial nacre using an innovative component: bacteria. The artificial nacre is made of biologically produced materials and has the toughness of natural nacre, while also being stiff and, surprisingly, bendable. The method used to create the novel material could lead to new applications in medicine, engineering -- and even constructing buildings on the moon.
Working out makes hydrogels perform more like muscle
Human skeletal muscles have a unique combination of properties that materials researchers seek for their own creations. They're strong, soft, full of water, and resistant to fatigue. A new study has found one way to give synthetic hydrogels this total package of characteristics: putting them through a vigorous workout.
Engineers demonstrate 'bubbles' of sand
A new study shows how two types of sand can behave like light and heavy liquids, shedding light on geological processes from mudslides to volcanoes and potentially enabling new technologies from pharmaceutical production to carbon capture.
Engineering researcher uses network science to understand how materials work
Using network science -- part of a larger mathematical field called graph theory -- a professor mapped long range atomic forces onto an incredibly complex graph to simulate macroscopic material behavior.
Antimicrobial paints have a blind spot
Researchers tested bacteria commonly found inside homes on samples of drywall coated with antimicrobial, synthetic latex paints. Within 24 hours, all bacteria died except for Bacillus timonensis, a spore-forming bacterium.
Exploring what happens inside fires and explosions
The inside of a fire might be the last place one would explore, but a new method to do just that could lead to advances in fighting fires, creating cleaner engines and even space travel.
Morphing origami takes a new shape, expanding use possibilities
Researchers have created a new type of origami that can morph from one pattern into a different one, or even a hybrid of two patterns, instantly altering many of its structural characteristics.
Up in arms: Insect-inspired arm technology aims to improve drones
Insect-inspired arm technology aims to improve drones to handle larger payloads.
'Deep learning' casts wide net for novel 2D materials
Engineers use 'deep learning' techniques to speed up simulations of novel two-dimensional materials to understand their characteristics and how they're affected by high temperature and radiation.
Graphene coating could help prevent lithium battery fires
Researchers report that graphene -- wonder material of the 21st century -- may take the oxygen out of lithium battery fires.
Laying the ground for robotic strategies in environmental protection
Roboticists have developed a robot named 'Romu' that can autonomously drive interlocking steel sheet piles into soil. The structures that it builds could function as retaining walls or check dams for erosion control, and, according to computer simulations, the robot could be deployed in swarms to help protect threatened areas that are flooded or extremely arid more effectively.
Researchers uncover hidden deicer risks affecting bridge health
Common magnesium chloride deicers used on roadways and bridges around the U.S. may be doing more damage than previously thought, researchers have found.
Teaching computers to intelligently design 'billions' of possible materials
Researchers are applying one of the first uses of deep learning -- the technology computers use to intelligently perform tasks such as recognizing language and driving autonomous vehicles -- to the field of materials science.
Novel role of water in production of renewable fuels
Engineers have discovered a novel approach for the water-assisted upgrading of the renewable chemical, furfural, doubling or tripling the rate of conversion.
New way of designing systems against correlated disruptions uses negative probability
Until now, systems engineers have struggled with the problem of planning for disaster impacts that are linked by correlation -- like those of earthquakes and tsunamis -- because of the cumbersome calculations necessary to precisely quantify the probabilities of all possible combinations of disruption occurrences. Now researchers have developed a new method for designing and optimizing systems subject to correlated disruptions.
Layered liquids arrange nanoparticles into useful configurations
Materials scientists have theorized a new 'oil-and-vinegar' approach to engineering self-assembling materials of unusual architectures made out of spherical nanoparticles. The resulting structures could prove useful to applications in optics, plasmonics, electronics and multi-stage catalysis.
Model learns how individual amino acids determine protein function
A machine-learning model computationally breaks down how segments of amino acid chains determine a protein's function, which could help researchers design and test new proteins for drug development or biological research.
New heart valve aimed at high-risk patients
Researchers have created the first-ever nanocomposite biomaterial heart-valve developed to reduce or eliminate complications related to heart transplants. By using a newly developed technique, the researchers were able to build a more durable valve that enables the heart to adapt faster and more seamlessly.
4D-printed materials can be stiff as wood or soft as sponge
Imagine smart materials that can morph from being stiff as wood to as soft as a sponge - and also change shape. Rutgers University-New Brunswick engineers have created flexible, lightweight materials with 4D printing that could lead to better shock absorption, morphing airplane or drone wings, soft robotics and tiny implantable biomedical devices.
A laser technique proves effective to recover material designed to protect industrial products
The system has been validated for non-stick and anticorrosive coatings used in the manufacturing of a wide range of objects from car engines to kitchen utensils.
Water-resistant electronic skin with self-healing abilities created
Inspired by jellyfish, researchers have created an electronic skin that is transparent, stretchable, touch-sensitive, and repairs itself in both wet and dry conditions. The novel material has wide-ranging uses, from water-resistant touch screens to soft robots aimed at mimicking biological tissues.
Light provides control for 3D printing with multiple materials
Scientists have developed a novel 3D printer that uses patterns of visible and ultraviolet light to dictate which of two monomers are polymerized to form a solid material. Different patterns of light provide the spatial control necessary to yield multi-material parts.
Novel technology aims to improve lithium metal battery life, safety
Rechargeable lithium metal batteries with increased energy density, performance, and safety may be possible with a newly-developed, solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI), according to researchers.
Scientists engineer mouse 'smart house' to study behavior
Researchers have developed a 'smart house' for mice, that allows them to study the animals' behavior with minimal disturbance for periods of up to 18 months.
Engineers develop inexpensive, smart stop sign to improve driver safety
According to the US Department of Transportation, more than half of all roadway fatalities occur on rural roads. Now engineers are building and testing a low-cost, self-powered thermal system that will detect vehicles, improve the visibility of stop signs and prevent early deaths.
Distracted drivers 29 times more likely to wreck in a highway work zone
Highway work zone crashes happen every 5.4 minutes. Now, a new study says an inattentive driver is 29 times more likely to cause a collision or near collision in a work zone
New blueprint for understanding, predicting and optimizing complex nanoparticles
Northwestern University researchers have developed a blueprint for understanding and predicting the properties and behavior of complex nanoparticles and optimizing their use for a broad range of scientific applications. These include catalysis, optoelectronics, transistors, bio-imaging, and energy storage and conversion.
Researchers engineer a tougher fiber
Researchers have developed a fiber that combines the elasticity of rubber with the strength of a metal, resulting in a tougher material that could be incorporated into soft robotics, packaging materials or next-generation textiles.
Automated speed enforcement doesn't just reduce collisions -- it helps reduce crime
It's widely accepted that automated photo enforcement programs targeting speeding help reduce collisions and promote safe driving. Now a new study suggests they can also significantly reduce crime in the neighborhoods in which they are deployed.
Fibers from old tires can improve fire resistance of concrete
A new way of protecting concrete from fire damage using materials recycled from old tires has been successfully tested.
Lobster's underbelly is as tough as industrial rubber
Flip a lobster on its back, and you'll see that the underside of its tail is split in segments connected by a translucent membrane that appears rather vulnerable when compared with the armor-like carapace that shields the rest of the crustacean. But engineers have found that this soft membrane is surprisingly tough, with a microscopic, layered, plywood-like structure that makes it remarkably tolerant to scrapes and cuts.
Sustainable electronics manufacturing breakthrough
Researchers are developing an eco-friendly, 3D printable solution for producing wireless Internet-of-Things (IoT) sensors that can be used and disposed of without contaminating the environment.
Developable mechanisms can reside inside the surface of a structure
Engineers detail new technology that allows them to build complex mechanisms into the exterior of a structure without taking up any actual space below the surface. This new class of mechanisms, called 'developable mechanisms,' get their name from developable surfaces, or materials that can take on 3-D shapes from flat conformations without tearing or stretching, like a sheet of paper or metal.
Researchers develop fire-retardant coating featuring renewable materials
Researchers are developing a new kind of flame-retardant coating using renewable, nontoxic materials readily found in nature, which could provide even more effective fire protection for several widely used materials.
Research will help urban planners prioritize bike lanes
A new virtual tool could help planners choose the best places to install bikes lanes in cities. The data-based tool builds on previous research that validated the safety benefits of bike lanes for cyclists and motorists.
Scientists use smartphones to improve dismal rating of nation's civil infrastructure
Scientists at the have developed smartphone-based technologies that can monitor civil infrastructure systems such as crumbing roads and aging bridges.
Researchers use artificial neural networks to streamline materials testing
Investigators have paired artificial neural networks (ANN) with dynamic mechanical analysis to quickly formulate and provide analytics on theoretical graphene-enhanced advanced composites.
Nano-infused ceramic could report on its own health
Ceramics with networked nanosheets of graphene and white graphene would have the unique ability to alter their electrical properties when strained. The surprising ability could lead to new types of structural sensors.
Magnetic teeth hold promise for materials and energy
Researchers have discovered a piece of the genetic puzzle that allows a mollusk to produce magnetite nanomaterials.
Toppled train offers insight into ground motion, origin of 1906 earthquake
By mathematically modeling the movements of a locomotive that toppled from the tracks north of San Francisco during the city's infamous 1906 earthquake, researchers have calculated a lower limit on the earthquake ground motion at the spot of the tipped train.
Measuring stress around cells
Tissues and organs in the human body are shaped through forces generated by cells, that push and pull, to 'sculpt' biological structures. Thanks to a new tool, scientists will now be able to watch, and map these forces.
Fluid-inspired material self-heals before your eyes
Engineers have developed a new coating strategy for metal that self-heals within seconds when scratched, scraped or cracked. The novel material could prevent these tiny defects from turning into localized corrosion, which can cause major structures to fail.
Static electricity could charge our electronics
Static electricity is one of the most common, yet poorly understand, forms of power generation. A new study suggests the cause of this hair-raising phenomenon is tiny structural changes that occur at the surface of materials when they come into contact with each other. The finding could someday help technology companies create more sustainable and longer-lasting power sources for small electronic devices.
Creating attraction between molecules deep in the periodic table
Researchers provide the first experimental and theoretical proof that it is possible to form strong, stable attractions between some of the heavier elements in the periodic table -- such as arsenic or even antimony. Because hydrogen is not involved in creating the bond between these elements, these new materials should be resistant to water and humidity.
From toilet to brickyard: Recycling biosolids to make sustainable bricks
Around 30 percent of the world's biosolids are stockpiled or sent to landfill each year, while over 3 billion cubic meters of clay soil is dug up for the global brickmaking industry. Using biosolids in bricks offers an innovative solution to these environmental challenges.
Mechanical engineers develop process to 3-D print piezoelectric materials
New printing technique and materials could be used to develop intelligent materials and self-adaptive infrastructures and transducers.
Stress fracture? Your foot hitting pavement wasn't the main problem
It starts as a persistent and irritating pain in the foot or lower leg, then it gets more intense, maybe with swelling, and soon a runner knows she's being sidelined by one of the most common running injuries: a stress fracture. These tiny cracks in the bone can halt training for months or even end a sports season. A segment of the multibillion-dollar wearables industry aims to save potential victims from this fate, but an engineering professor found a major problem: the devices are measuring the wrong thing.
Additive manufacturing reflects fundamental metallurgical principles to create materials
Engineers have been taking a novel approach to the development of engineering components produced using additive manufacturing.
Proposed engineering method could help make buildings and bridges safer
Researchers discovered that the distance between dislocations in nanolayer interfaces of pearlite can determine how much the material can stretch or contract without breaking (ductility). The dislocations are disruptions in the regular arrangements of atoms in nanolayers. This discovery opens the possibility of engineering materials with higher ductility by simply manipulating the spacing between their dislocations and may improve the safety of structures such as buildings and bridges in earthquakes.
Drones shown to make traffic crash site assessments safer, faster and more accurate
Research shows that drones can be more effective and safer in crash mapping of vehicular highway accidents than conventional methods. Drones using new imaging technology allows highway safety officers to capture and print 3D composites of crash sites and reduce mapping time and improve traffic flow following a crash by 60 percent.
Breakthrough in ice-repelling materials
Icy weather is blamed for multibillion dollar losses every year in the United States, including delays and damage related to air travel, infrastructure and power generation and transmission facilities. Now researchers have reported creating a durable silicone polymer coating capable of repelling ice from any surface.

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